Anthony Fisher says KIPP Tulsa prepared him for life beyond high school and college


Anthony Fisher is a KIPP Tulsa success story

By Executive Editor Nehemiah D. Frank 

Anthony Fisher is a 2010 KIPP Tulsa College Preparatory graduate and is now a full-time student studying Information-Security Systems, at Oklahoma State University.

Fisher whole-heartedly believes every student in North Tulsa should have the opportunity to attend a high-quality school.

His time at KIPP granted him the opportunity to experience the world outside of North Tulsa.

One year ago, KIPP flew Fisher and some of his classmates to our nation’s capitol. While in Washington, D.C., the arena of politics opened Fisher’s eyes to how complex and intricate workings of government. He became enlightened and inspired  by visiting the various national museums and  monuments.

“While in Chicago, we went to several museums such as the Aerospace and Holocaust museums,” he said. Both events were eye-opening and life-changing.

Fisher says African-American students from North Tulsa seldom have opportunities like the ones he experienced at KIPP. He said they just don’t exist in North Tulsa.

When Fisher transitioned from KIPP to Booker T. Washington High School, he noted that many students weren’t ready for the rigorous academic demand that was required. “Although many succeeded, many struggled too,” he explained.

Fisher credits his academic success at Booker T. to the solid foundation laid in his early years at KIPP Tulsa.

“Without KIPP Tulsa, I would not be in the position I am in today.”

“Without KIPP Tulsa, I would not be majoring in Information-Systems Security.”

“Without KIPP Tulsa, I would not be afforded the opportunity to obtain higher education and would be unprepared for the competitive world,” Fisher says.

28471432_1908151969235733_7711477870770041678_n88-percent of KIPP graduates move on to attend college.

The average KIPPster grows 1.4 years in math and 1.6 years in reading every year.

KIPP aims to prepare all KIPPsters for college and beyond. Students have longer school days, which helps in creating more innovative teaching and a motivating learning environment.

During KIPP’s conception, Dr. Millard House was the principal. Mr. Darius Kirk became the principal during Anthony’s 8-grade year. Andrew McRae is the current principal at KIPP High School.

“I think it is important to have a high school because the structure and experience KIPP can provide its students is unmatched. There is a difference between promoting academic excellence and actually providing it. High school is meant to prepare students for the next level — whatever is next for the student, which would ideally be college. Most high schools [in Tulsa] don’t do that. Many of my fellow classmates struggled in high school and naturally struggled in college for behavioral or academic reasons. Long after my KIPP years, I still rely on skills and behavior I learned while I attended KIPP,” says Anthony.

Fisher spoke a few Mondays ago in support of a KIPP High School at the Tulsa Public School Board meeting in hopes TPS will grant KIPP a High School. KIPP Tulsa officials are hoping Students, with seemingly bleak opportunities, will have better outcomes like Anthony’s if KIPP Tulsa College Preparatory gets a high school.

The Tulsa Public School District voted 6 to 1 this past Monday, March 5, 2018, to approve KIPP’s proposal for a high school. Jennettie Marshall was the only school board member who voted against the approval of the KIPP high school.

20507737_10208835206550886_2670263807103671918_oNehemiah D. Frank is the Founder & Editor in Chief of the Black Wall St. Times. Frank is also the Co-Executive Producer of the “Dominic Durant Sports Show.” Frank graduated from Harold Washington College in Chicago, IL in General Studies, and earned a 2nd degree in Political Science from Oklahoma State University. He is highly involved in community activism, a middle school teacher at Sankofa School of the Performing Arts, a blogger for Education Post, and dedicates most of his time to empowering and uplifting his community. Frank is a 2017 Terence Crutcher Foundation Honoree and has been featured on NBC, Blavity, and Tulsa People