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Fifty Years After Kerner, the Nation Is Still Separate and Unequal, But It Doesn’t Have to Be This Way

A high-quality, well-rounded education—one that includes mathematics and reading as well as the sciences, social studies and civics, world languages, physical education, and the arts—prepares our children to thrive in college and careers, and as engaged members of our democratic society. And yet, students of color and students from low-income families continuously are denied their right to learn because we choose, as a society, to provide them with less.

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Risha Grant teaches America how to call its own BS

She is self-described as a small-town girl, ex-preacher’s wife, bisexual and African American. The cards of predictive jeers couldn’t be stacked any higher against her. Yet, having been reared in the most conservative state in the nation — Oklahoma, where not one county voted for Barack Obama in 2008 — she’s learned to recognize her own “BS”. Now, she helps others to understand and acknowledge their own BS, and the city she lives in is better for it.

In reviewing the Confederate Soldier’s Surname on a Tulsa Public School

Last week I had the privilege of sitting down with a board member who voted in favor of keeping the name out of respect for the individuals who live in the Lee District. It was one of the best conversations I have ever had in my life. We approached one another as human beings. I sat at a table across from an American who looked different from me and allowed myself to become vulnerable with the hope of reaching the heart.

Censoring the truth to control the narrative

There is something fundamentally wrong with the foundation of our democratic institution when media companies are more concerned with clicks than their ability to exist as free stand alone institutions. It amazes me how so many political pundits — so-called patriots of America who love, eat, breathe and sleep the Constitution — will not speak out against this apparent covert attack of the First Amendment.

A black teacher’s prayer

I pray that my students will be so lucky enough to arrive in a classroom with a culturally competent teacher who looks like them and is passionately and unapologetically black. And should they not land in a class with a teacher who does not share the same racial ancestry, my next prayer is that they will encounter a benevolent teacher who will love and celebrate them as I have done. I pray they will gain a wonderful pedagogue or role model who will tell them that the sky is the limit for them and that they can be whatever their heart so desires.