Health

Solutions to Culturally Specific Health Disparities Project Offers Solutions, Strategies for Those Living with Diabetes and Disabilities

Screen Shot 2018-02-04 at 6.40.31 PM.jpg

On February 27, 2018, the Langston University Department of Rehabilitation Counseling in partnership with Tulsa Healthy Start and The Institute for Developing Communities will host the first in a series of workshops designed to assist those living with diabetes and the subsequent disabilities that impact many citizens suffering from chronic illnesses.  This event will be hosted at Langston University Tulsa, located at 914 N. Greenwood Avenue from 10am-3pm, featuring breakout sessions, a panel discussion and a keynote speaker that will address issues specific to those diagnosed with diabetes.  Lunch will be provided, RSVP is required.  The topic of Diabetes and Disabilities was selected to address the disproportionate prevalence of this disease in the African American and other diverse communities.  The symposium will further build upon the research of Dr. Phillip Lewis and Ms. Sunshine Graham; a graduate student in Rehabilitation Counseling at Langston University and Albert Schweitzer Fellow.  Ms. Graham chooses to offer community support for those diagnosed with diabetes in honor of her mother, Linda Cooper-Hinson, who passed away in February of last year. 

African Americans, Native Americans, and other disadvantaged groups often suffer from diabetes and the subsequent disabilities associated with long-term diabetes management at disproportionate rates as compared to other ethnic groups.  This event will seek to provide participants with strategies for chronic disease self-management and provide an educational component for students entering the various allied health professions.   Continuing Education Units will be offered to LPC credentialed professionals.  Dr. Phillip Lewis, Graduate Coordinator of the Department, Rehabilitation Counseling and Disability Studies states, “Our goal is to improve the quality of life for those suffering from the emotional distress of being at risk or diagnosed with various chronic diseases, and those that acquire disabilities as result”.  Lewis also believes, “that being uninformed of the reality of health disparities is a deadly risk, as many illnesses often develop over time, which can be prevented or reversed when detected early”.  Other identified goals of the symposium include empowering those from diverse communities to be informed, presenting methods of effective chronic disease self-management, resulting in improved quality and increased longevity of life.  ” Our students look forward to these types of opportunities to serve their community while working to achieve their educational goals.”

There is no fee for attendance, however, RSVP is required. Contact Thomas Boxley at (918) 401-0534 by phone; by email at tidcok@gmail.com.  Please RSVP your attendance by close of business, Friday, February 16, 2018.

Advertisements