Advertisements

Author Archives

The Black Wall St Times

A Digital Media Company

Black Worshiper Told to Use Separate Restroom

The Raleigh White congregation agreed three years ago to share its space with a predominantly black congregation, but conflicts arose. In March, when some of the black worshippers arrived at the church unexpectedly, a black female was told to use the restroom at a nearby convenience store, rather than the restroom in the church.

Advertisements

Contributing Editor Nate Morris’ Facebook post about 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre goes viral

Greenwood ― the most preeminent black community in the United States at the time ― was home to 10,000 residents and contained scores of black-owned businesses, hotels, restaurants, law offices, doctors offices, movie theaters, and more. Following an incident between a young black man and a young white woman in a downtown elevator, many of the nearly 3,200 Klan members in Tulsa and countless more white vigilantes armed themselves with firearms and marched north to Greenwood.

Ricco Wright Named Managing Editor of The Black Wall Street Times

“The Black Wall Street Times is to Tulsa today what The Crisis was to Harlem a century ago. But our eyes are gazing at the future as much as our minds are reflecting on the past. The Black Wall Street Times is a global enterprise. Technology these days affords those who can access it the opportunity to make our global community local. What a powerful reality! That’s why we’ll never charge our readers. Access is the new civil right.” – Ricco Wright

Y’all Can Have Betsy DeVos, I’m Checking for Stacy Abrams

“If a principal or a teacher finds out that a certain child is undocumented, or his or her family members are undocumented, do you feel that the principal or teacher is responsible to call ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement) and to have that family reported?”

Her response? “Sir, I think that’s a school decision. That’s a local community decision. And again, I refer to the fact that we have laws and we also are compassionate.”

Fifty Years After Kerner, the Nation Is Still Separate and Unequal, But It Doesn’t Have to Be This Way

A high-quality, well-rounded education—one that includes mathematics and reading as well as the sciences, social studies and civics, world languages, physical education, and the arts—prepares our children to thrive in college and careers, and as engaged members of our democratic society. And yet, students of color and students from low-income families continuously are denied their right to learn because we choose, as a society, to provide them with less.