Literature

It’s Lit

Tomorrow Tulsa begins a new chapter in the reading community as Crystal Rene launches the first edition of It’s Lit, a reading and discussion group held at Mainline Art Bar. 

“Everyone is so busy these days, and self-care is usually the last thing that gets attention. I thought it would be great to get people together with the intention of reading and discussing books from diverse genres, and authors. I wanted to challenge myself by reading lit that is outside of my comfort zone, and bring lit to others with the same intention.

its lit crystal.jpg

At our first meeting, I want to talk about how what we want this to look like, because this is OUR book club. I am going to create a page before our first “meeting”… I am so excited about our first read, and to hear different perspectives.

I will have some discussion questions…but again, this is very fluid..lets get together…”, states Crystal on her vision to start a book club in Tulsa.

It’s #Lit will illuminate your mind #Tulsa
Feel free to participate in the #litdiscussion even if you have not read the book. You might just learn something about yourself, our city, or the world.
Our first read is “She’s Come Undone” authored by Wally Lamb.

 

 

Literary Editor
Casey McLerran is the Literary Editor at the Black Wall Street Times. She is a Sooner State transplant from Forest Hills, NY. McLerran arrived in Oklahoma at the age of three shortly after gentrification displaced her and her family out of their home in New York. At first glance, many think they have McLerran figured out. To be frank, she’s a biracial American young woman that unapologetically embraces her half-African identity — a feminist-womanist she is. Her pen operates as her voice as well as her sword. Her accolades include the 2018 Rural Oklahoma Poetry Museum’s Oklahoma Poem Award, a business management degree, and her three beautiful children. Her objective with the Black Wall Street Times is to elevate and amplify the literary art of modern black American culture, pay tribute to African-American literary trailblazers, all while simultaneously linking and introducing children to the world of colorful American writers.

 

 

Advertisements