Tag: Oklahoma

Oklahoma’s NAACP has Dr. Eric Gill’s back | Issues Statement

Oklahoma City – Today Oklahoma State Conference National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) calls for a meeting with the Oklahoma Highway Patrol Commissioner concerning the treatment of Dr. Reverend Eric Gill, Youth Minister at Metropolitan Baptist Church, and former Basketball Coach at Heritage Hall School.  Dr. Gill is approximately 5’6”, 170lbs and physically not seen as an immediate threat to anyone.

When did putting your hands up – a universal sign of surrender – become a message of “having drugs?” This is a prime example of Betty Shelby’s irrational behavior when she killed Terence Crutcher.  According to the Tulsa Police officers, they stated that he looked like a “Big Black BAD DUDE.”  With his hands in the air, according to Betty Shelby, Mr. Crutcher was reaching for a gun, and no one thought to question whether his hands being next to the car window was simply a reflection.  “It is evident why so many law enforcement officers are acquitted when encountering African-Americans who they say are a big bad black dude no matter their height or weight.” Said Anthony R. Douglas, President Oklahoma State NAACP. 

When working-class people step to the plate, revolutions are born.

Tulsa, Okla. — In the birthplace of local activism and mass movements in Tulsa, Our Revolution’s local chapter held its first body-meeting at the Rudisill Regional Library.

Unlike smaller organizations throughout the city, Our Revolution Tulsa is a subset of the national party, which was started by US Sen. Bernie Sanders. The social-democratic, political-action organization’s goals are to revitalize American democracy, empower progressive leaders, and elevate political consciousness to the everyday man and woman in this country.

A brief history of​ how black children internalize racism in the classroom

“I had often observed, that when her mother washed her face it looked very rosy; but when she washed mine it did not look so; I therefore tried oftentimes myself if I could not by washing make my face of the same color as my little play-mate(Mary), but it was all in vain; and I now began to be mortified at the difference in our complexions. (Equiano, 1794, p.64)”

History often​ repeats itself,​ but we must fight for better days

People, who are usually white, often tell me that I am too obsessed with race. In fact, I have even been criticized and compared to a race fanatic. Notwithstanding those allegations, I will always believe that systemic racism is a facet for today’s illiteracy curse plaguing the multitude of Black children some one-hundred-fifty years after the Emancipation Proclamation — the epoch, in American history, that lead to the appearance of Black liberation. However, I, now, reckon the more significant problem stems from an aristocratic class of Americans, one-percenters — mostly white — who do not care about people of color nor poor White people. Therefore, it is incumbent upon all of us —Black, Brown, and White — to participate in that extension of democracy granted to the masses by the few decent, human beings among the upper classes. 

Earnest Kellum Finds Success At Langston Hughes Academy

“One of the things we really strive to do is have instructors that look like our children. We feel that it is very important in building the bonding relationships that will last a life time. We have quite a few male teachers and a lot of them are ministers and they a huge impact on the young men as well as the young women.” – Ms. Cherly Henderson is a History Teacher at Langston Huges Academy.

Oklahoma legislators don’t give a d–n about public education

Okla. — Let’s be Frank! What happened this past Tuesday at the Oklahoma state capital was pretty f–ked-up. Once again, state legislators had the opportunity to halt the pedagogue brain-drain that has haunted the state since 2008; but of course, Oklahoma leaders voted against a revenue bill that would have given state teachers their much needed and well deserved, although minuscule, pay raise of $3,000.